Near-Infrared (NIR) Spectroscopy

Trouw Nutrition employs near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy analysis for a quicker, non-destructive method without producing hazardous waste or requiring chemicals or consumables.Most pet food manufacturers and premix suppliers use wet chemistry to analyze product consistency and uniformity, but Trouw Nutrition employs near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy analysis for a quicker, non-destructive method without producing hazardous waste or requiring chemicals or consumables.

Conducted with a rapid content analyzer, NIR spectroscopy analysis measures the absorption of light, or lack thereof, of organic bonds, making it an excellent quality assurance method for analyzing organic compound-containing vitamins, proteins, liquids, fat, starch, cellulose, carbohydrates and glucose.

Using discriminant analysis, the NIR spectra results of a single sample can be compared to that of the comprehensive collection of historical data stored in our proprietary database. Through this comparison, lab technicians can discern if and where the sample deviates from the accepted “norm” established by the historical data. 

To account for all expected variations, such as sample consistency, seasonal changes, and multiple suppliers, the historical data set needs to include a library of spectra collected over at least a few years to produce a successful calibration. With a robust database built on 10 years of data collected across multiple locations, Trouw Nutrition's thorough calibration accounts for wavelength region, scatter correction, math treatment, and regression for optimal results.

Variations in the data could be a sign of potency abnormality, particle size inconsistency, color variation, contamination, or raw material sourcing differences. NIR testing helps our technicians know and identify in a matter of minutes when an outlier exists. The data reveals inconsistencies not visible to the human eye.  

The NIR spectra shows how a single sample, represented by the yellow line, compares to the collection of historical sample data, represented by the gray line.

The above NIR spectra shows how a single sample, represented by the yellow line, compares to the collection of historical sample data, represented by the gray line.